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Friday, 24 May 2013

China's Most Ridiculous Censored Websites

The Chinese government's vast web of laws on Internet restriction is baffling in itself, before we even begin considering the website's that are censored under such acts. Many see this as a form of oppression and free speech platforms, namely influential social networking sites, cannot be accessed by Chinese citizens. So let's take a look at the top 5 blocked sites that really should not have been censored.


5: Google Docs/Drive

A simple Google offering that allows documents to be created, managed, stored and shared online, which begs the question of why it remains blocked. At the same time that the Chinese government made this decision, they also removed access to other Google offerings such as maps.

4: YouTube

Another strange decision, YouTube has been blocked since 2009 and there are no signs that this will be reversed anytime soon. Speaking in 2009, Scott Rubin of Google stated that "we do not know the reason for the blockage and we are working as quickly as possible to restore access".

3: Amazon Japan

What could possibly be offensive or disruptive about Chinese citizens having a centralised e-commerce platform to purchase all sorts of products? Yet between the 15th and 17th of June last year, the Chinese government saw something unfit with the site and censored it. 

2: IMDB

The Internet Movie Database was blocked for 3 years and only had the ban, which was enforced in 2010, recently removed in April of this year. The reason for this censorship was due to IMDB's details about the documentary 'When the Dragon Swallowed the Sun', which depicts Beijing's occupation of Tibet in 1950. 

1: Amnesty International:

Why would the Chinese government restrict access to the website of a human organisation for an entire year? Perhaps it was a result of this quote from Amnesty International, which states that China "has the largest recorded number of imprisoned journalists and cyber-dissidents in the world".